Posts in the ‘200 Years’ Category

The Most Important Article in NEJM History

Posted by Karen Buckley • November 1st, 2012

Throughout the 200th anniversary year we have asked for your votes, and you have responded with a resounding favorite. Since the 1846 report from Boston surgeon Henry Jacob Bigelow, “Insensibility during Surgical Operations Produced by Inhalation,” so many of the significant advances we’ve seen rely on the use of anesthesia. It is difficult to imagine medicine today… Read More…

What Will the Future Bring?

Posted by Karen Buckley • September 20th, 2012

Throughout the 200th anniversary year, we’ve been looking back at the most important NEJM articles in history.  Now, we’re looking ahead.  What do you think the major developments of the next decade will be?  We have tried to imagine how medicine and science might lead to changes that today are unimaginable.  The studies described below… Read More…

Vote for the Most Important NEJM Article, 2000-2010

Posted by Karen Buckley • August 23rd, 2012

We’re getting close to the end of our rounds of voting, looking this month at the last decade to see what recent advances were the most significant. In 2001, Druker and colleagues published the trials of imatinib for chronic myeloid leukemia in patients with the Philadelphia chromosome abnormality, which ushered in the era of cancer… Read More…

Was there a moment that shaped the doctor you are today?

Posted by Karen Buckley • August 9th, 2012

What was your most memorable day in medical school? Or, is there an experience you will always remember from your time as a resident/trainee? We’d like to hear your story about a moment that shaped the doctor you have become. On Facebook, Cherry Adjchavanich said, “Day 1 of Gross Anatomy Lab.”  Others best remember graduating,… Read More…

Vote for the Most Important Article, 1990-1999

Posted by Karen Buckley • July 26th, 2012

There are only five days left to vote for the NEJM article that you think was the most significant advance of the 1990s.  Which one of these was it? Vote now! Although it had previously been shown that Helicobacter pylori caused gastritis and peptic ulcers, two pioneering studies published in 1991, led by Nomura and Parsonnet,… Read More…

View Dialogues in Medicine Videos

Posted by Karen Buckley • July 12th, 2012

What are the challenges in developing an HIV vaccine? What strategies do we need to solve maternal/fetal health issues today? How can breast cancer patients be diagnosed and treated more effectively? How can we insure that advances in cardiology make the patient’s life better? Prominent experts gathered in Boston on June 22 to discuss these… Read More…

Join Us For a Live Webcast on Friday, June 22

Posted by Karen Buckley • June 14th, 2012

The NEJM 200th anniversary symposium, Dialogues in Medicine: Physicians and Patients on 200 Years of Progress, is only a week away!  You are all invited to participate in one or all four sessions via live webcast on Friday, June 22 from 9 AM to 5 PM Eastern time.  Get a group together to hear our… Read More…

What advice would you give to an aspiring doctor today?

Posted by Karen Buckley • June 7th, 2012

Whether you’re a young resident or you’ve been practicing for 50 years, you may have words of wisdom to provide for those who have just graduated from medical school, or even those who plan to start soon. Read the stories your peers have shared, and tell us about the lessons you’ve learned. Behzad Amir-Ansari passes… Read More…

Vote for the Most Important Article, 1980-1989

Posted by Karen Buckley • June 1st, 2012

For the most important advance during the early years of NEJM, you voted for the beginning of ether anesthesia. From 1880-1929, it was the first description of platelets, and from 1930-1959, the beginning of bone marrow transplantation. The 1960s brought us studies on an attenuated measles vaccine, and the first oral ACE inhibitor was introduced… Read More…

Vote for the Most Important NEJM Article (1970-1979)

Posted by Karen Buckley • May 24th, 2012

What was the most important medical advance reported in NEJM between 1970 and 1979?  There are seven days left in this round.  Vote now! In a 1970 article, Drs. Swan, Ganz and colleagues described a new device for measuring pressures in the right side of the heart and pulmonary capillary wedge. Until then, rigid catheters were… Read More…