Posts in the ‘Insights’ Category

Insights are brief stories about NEJM content, written by contributors appointed by NEJM editorial staff. While the posts often include quotes from editors, and are approved by editors, these blog posts about NEJM content are not published in NEJM, and should not be considered NEJM editorials or commentary. They are intended to provide insight into the clinical significance of interesting content found on NEJM.org, and where it may lead us in practice and research. Questions are included at the end to stimulate thinking and discussion.

Prednisolone or Pentoxifylline for Alcoholic Hepatitis

Posted by Chana Sacks • April 22nd, 2015

Intern year, they say, is about learning to distinguish “sick” from “not sick.” As the intern on-call overnight, you call the Emergency Department physician for pass off on Mr. Jones; when you hear “46-year-old man with heavy alcohol use disorder presenting with new jaundice and mild confusion,” it takes you only a split second to recognize… Read More…

Effects of Red-Cell Storage Duration on Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery

Posted by Chana Sacks • April 8th, 2015

“Age,” the great boxer Muhammad Ali famously said, “is whatever you think it is. You are as old as you think you are.” The role that aging plays in vitality, strength, and wisdom has long been debated, but more recently the question of whether younger is better has been raised about red blood cells.  Currently, blood… Read More…

Initial Antibiotic Choice for Community Acquired Pneumonia

Posted by John Staples • April 2nd, 2015

The basic symptoms which occur in pneumonia … are as follows: acute fever, sticking pain in the side, short rapid breaths, serrated pulse and cough.   – Maimonides (1138–1204 AD) Antibiotic treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is one of the most remarkable medical developments of the 20th century, yet the choice of initial antibiotics is not… Read More…

Detecting Trisomy

Posted by Rena Xu • April 1st, 2015

A simple prenatal blood test made national headlines last year after a study published in NEJM reported its superiority to standard prenatal screening. The test, called cell-free fetal DNA (cfDNA), identified common trisomies (21, 18, and 13) by detecting fragments of fetal DNA in maternal blood. Screening could be done early in a pregnancy and… Read More…

The Final Nail in Early Goal Directed Therapy’s Coffin?

Posted by Joshua Allen-Dicker • March 24th, 2015

You are called to evaluate Ms. Smith urgently.  She reports several days of progressive malaise, weakness and a new cough. On your exam she is tachycardic, tachypneic and febrile.  You diagnose Ms. Smith with sepsis and explain the importance of quickly treating this life-threatening condition.  In the United States, situations like this—presentations leading to the… Read More…

CABG or PCI in Patients with Coronary Disease?

Posted by Chana Sacks • March 16th, 2015

The great singer Whitney Houston posed a question over 25 years ago that many still ponder today.  “Where,” she asked, “do broken hearts go?” Of course, her classic song asks us to imagine a destination for the pain wrought by the dissolution of love.  Physicians, however, have more concrete possibilities in mind when asking where to… Read More…

Improved Air Quality and Lung Development in Children

Posted by Chana Sacks • March 4th, 2015

In 1905, the Public Health Congress convened in London, where Dr. Henry Antoine des Voeux presented a paper entitled “Fog and Smoke.”  In it, he described the characteristic black smoky fog – or “smog” – that enveloped London and many of the world’s other urban centers.  Credited with coining this new term, Dr. des Voeux… Read More…

Outcomes of Pregnancy After Bariatric Surgery

Posted by Daniela Lamas • February 25th, 2015

Your patient has been trying to lose weight for years. But no matter how many grapefruits she eats, whether she goes ‘gluten free’ or replaces her snacks with lean meats and long walks on the treadmill, the 35-year old’s weight has hit a plateau. And with the weight have come a series of troubling health effects,… Read More…

Peanut Consumption in Infants at Risk for Peanut Allergy

Posted by Chana Sacks • February 23rd, 2015

In a famous “Peanuts” cartoon, a glum Charlie Brown sits alone on a bench, eating a sandwich; his thought bubble reads, “Nothing takes the taste out of peanut butter quite like unrequited love.”  Charles Schulz was perhaps better than any other at simply and brilliantly capturing the timeless angst that defines the human condition. And… Read More…

Preexposure Prophylaxis for HIV-1 Infection

Posted by Chana Sacks • February 4th, 2015

In December 2007, Elizabeth Mataka, the United Nations Special Envoy for HIV/AIDS in Africa, highlighted one of many stark realities of the HIV epidemic: “61% of all those living with HIV in Africa are women,” she wrote. “And 26 years into the epidemic, we know that underpinning this terrible statistic is gender inequality.” Condoms work. But… Read More…