Posts in the ‘Physicians-In-Training’ Category

The posts below are excerpted from the NEJM Resident e-Bulletin, a free weekly email of teaching topics. Including the content here in Now@NEJM enables you to have a conversation or ask questions about clinical points that interest you. To receive the email version, register as a student or resident on NEJM.org.

Management of Skin Abscesses

Posted by Sara Fazio • March 14th, 2014

The incidence of abscesses is increasing, and community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has become common. A new review article explains the role of ultrasonography and provides guidance on the management of skin abscesses and the use of antibiotics. Abscesses are one of the most common skin conditions managed by general practitioners and emergency physicians. The… Read More…

29-Year-Old Man with Headache and Diplopia

Posted by Sara Fazio • March 14th, 2014

In the latest Case Record of the Massachusetts General Hospital, a 29-year-old man was admitted to the hospital because of headache, vomiting, photophobia, diplopia, and stiff neck. He was born in Southeast Asia. Brain imaging showed diffuse leptomeningeal enhancement. Cultures were sterile. A diagnostic procedure was performed. Chronic meningitis differs in important ways from acute… Read More…

Global Supply of Health Professionals

Posted by Sara Fazio • March 7th, 2014

The world’s need for and supply of health professionals is in flux. The latest article in the Global Health Series reviews the supply of and demand for physicians and nurses around the world. An interactive graphic shows the density of health workers in each country. There is a global crisis of severe shortages and marked… Read More…

Wasting Away

Posted by Sara Fazio • March 7th, 2014

In the latest Clinical Problem-Solving article, a 40-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with pain, weakness, and poor oral intake. In the 3 months preceding presentation, she noted the gradual onset of bilateral diffuse flank pain that progressed to affect her lower back, abdomen, and both arms and legs. On skeletal imaging, osteomalacia can… Read More…

Bleeding and Coagulopathies in Critical Care

Posted by Sara Fazio • February 28th, 2014

In the latest article in our Critical Care series, “Bleeding and Coagulopathies in Critical Care,” common abnormalities of blood coagulation leading to thrombosis or bleeding in the intensive care unit are reviewed. The definition of a coagulopathy is “a condition in which the blood’s ability to clot is impaired.” Clinical Pearls • What are possible adverse events… Read More…

Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder

Posted by Sara Fazio • February 28th, 2014

The latest review in our Clinical Practice series is, “Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder in Children and Adolescents,” from Dr. Heidi M. Feldman of Stanford University School of Medicine and Dr. Michael I. Reiff of University of Minnesota. ADHD in children is characterized by inattention, hyperactivity, impulsivity, or a combination of these symptoms, which compromise basic everyday… Read More…

35-Day-Old Boy with Severe Anemia

Posted by Sara Fazio • February 21st, 2014

In the latest Case Record of the Massachusetts General Hospital, a 35-day-old boy was admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit because of fever, vomiting, and severe anemia. On admission, he had signs of respiratory distress and tachycardia, with a heart rate of 176 beats per minute. A diagnosis was made. Young infants with bacterial… Read More…

Lung Auscultation

Posted by Sara Fazio • February 21st, 2014

A new short review of classic lung sounds includes both audio clips and interpretations made in the light of modern pulmonary acoustics. Modern computer-assisted techniques have also allowed precise recording and analysis of lung sounds, prompting the correlation of acoustic indexes with measures of lung mechanics. This innovative, though still little used, approach has improved… Read More…

Occupational Asthma

Posted by Sara Fazio • February 14th, 2014

Occupational asthma has been defined as asthma due to conditions attributable to work exposures, not to causes outside the workplace. A new review article focuses on current data on pathogenesis, evaluation, and management. Asthma is common in the general population, including among those in the workforce. Work exposures can cause or exacerbate asthma and can… Read More…

Fever, Rash, and Renal Failure

Posted by Sara Fazio • February 14th, 2014

In the latest Case Record of the Massachusetts General Hospital, a 59-year-old man was admitted to the hospital because of fever, confusion, rash, thrombocytopenia, and renal failure, 10 days after a hunting trip in the Nevada valley. The combination of suspected infection, vasculopathy of small or medium-size vessels, thrombocytopenia, myositis, myocarditis, encephalitis, and possible tick… Read More…