Posts Tagged ‘asthma’

Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction

Posted by Carla Rothaus • February 13th, 2015

Asthma or asthma-like conditions can limit the ability of athletes to perform. This article reviews the diagnosis and treatment of asthma and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in athletes. The term exercise-induced bronchoconstriction describes the transient narrowing of the airways after exercise, a phenomenon that occurs frequently among athletes who may not have a diagnosis of asthma or… Read More…

Allergic Rhinitis

Posted by Carla Rothaus • January 30th, 2015

Allergic rhinitis is common and is often associated with asthma. Treatment includes intranasal glucocorticoids, oral and nasal antihistamines, leukotriene-receptor antagonists, and, when pharmacotherapy is not effective or produces unacceptable side effects, allergen immunotherapy. Read the latest Clinical Practice review on this topic. The frequency of sensitization to inhalant allergens is increasing and is now more than 40%… Read More…

Anti–Interleukin-5 Monoclonal Antibody to Treat Severe Eosinophilic Asthma

Posted by Daniela Lamas • September 24th, 2014

Most asthma patients who come to your pulmonary office get better. With a regimen of inhaled therapies and possibly a short course of oral corticosteroids, the wheeze and cough and shortness of breath remit. But the patient you are seeing in clinic today is still struggling. She’s tried every inhaler at its maximum dose and… Read More…

Dupilumab as a Treatment for Atopic Dermatitis

Posted by Rachel Wolfson • July 9th, 2014

For thousands of years, our knowledge of medications has largely been based on trial and error: we haphazardly used substances and learned from the effects. Within the last half a century, however, rational drug design slowly took to the forefront as scientific discoveries improved our understanding of the underlying pathogenesis of diseases. While there have… Read More…

Mild Asthma

Posted by Sara Fazio • August 9th, 2013

Mild, persistent asthma is common but underdiagnosed and often undertreated. Regular controller treatment with lowdose inhaled glucocorticoids and rescue treatment with short-acting beta2-agonists as needed is recommended initially. Treatment is adjusted on the basis of the response within 3 to 4 months. The latest article in our Clinical Practice series comes from Dr. Elisabeth H…. Read More…

Another Bench-to-Bedside Story in the Treatment of Asthma

Posted by Rachel Wolfson • June 26th, 2013

In the early 20th century, the physician’s toolbox for asthma included adrenergic stimulants and belladonna alkaloids derived from the thorn-apple plant. Fifty years later, corticosteroids were added to the repertoire. (See the NEJM 200th anniversary review article on asthma.) But the next 50 years witnessed much more accelerated changes as basic science advances inspired the… Read More…

Tiotropium and the ancient datura plant: Revisiting the role of antimuscarinic therapy in asthma

Posted by Jamie Colbert • September 6th, 2012

For centuries the datura plant has been used for treatment of respiratory disease. The plant, also known as jimson weed or devil’s trumpet, is a potent member of the alkaloid family with antimuscarinic properties. American physicians in the 19th century would commonly recommend patients to smoke datura leaves for relief of asthma and obstructive airway… Read More…

Whistling in the Dark

Posted by Sara Fazio • May 4th, 2012

In a new Clinical Problem-Solving article, shortness of breath, fever, and cough productive of yellow sputum developed in a 38-year-old woman soon after the birth of her third child. Although her symptoms initially resolved with antibiotics, an intermittent nonproductive cough, wheezing, and shortness of breath soon followed. It is important to consider a broad differential… Read More…

Constrictive Bronchiolitis

Posted by Daniela Lamas • July 20th, 2011

A soldier returns from deployment in Iraq. A non-smoker without a history of asthma or other lung disease, he begins to notice that he’s no longer able to complete the army exercise regimen without becoming short of breath. The onset is insidious, but the impairment real: he isn’t even able to meet the fitness standard… Read More…

Breathing Easy

Posted by Rena Xu • July 13th, 2011

If a treatment for asthma makes an asthma patient feel better, did it work?  It’s hard to say, according to an article by Wechsler et al published this week in NEJM.  The authors report the results of a randomized double-blind crossover pilot study comparing the effectiveness of four interventions: an active albuterol inhaler, a placebo… Read More…