Posts Tagged ‘asthma’

Chronic Cough

Posted by • October 20th, 2016

Cough is the most common symptom for which patients seek medical attention. Chronic cough is more common among women than among men, most commonly occurs in the fifth and sixth decades of life, and can persist for years, with substantial physical, social, and psychological effects. Professional guidelines describe systematic approaches to the evaluation and management… Read More…

Are Long-Acting Beta-Agonists Safe to Add to Treatment Regimens for Asthma in Children?

Posted by • August 31st, 2016

Janine is a 9-year-old girl who you’ve been seeing in your clinic for years. She struggles with asthma despite treatment with low-dose inhaled glucocorticoids. You wonder if any other medications can be added to her treatment regimen, and peruse the literature on long-acting beta-agonists (LABAs). The literature is mixed – it seems clear that LABAs,… Read More…

Asthma Risk, Farming, and Innate Immunity

Posted by • August 3rd, 2016

Mrs. Newton and Janice, her 2-year-old daughter, are seeing you for a child wellness check-up.  Mrs. Newton asks you about asthma risks and reports that she’s read somewhere in a parenting magazine that letting children play in the dirt and be exposed to animals reduces risks of asthma and allergies.  She asks what you know… Read More…

The Asthma-COPD Overlap Syndrome

Posted by • September 25th, 2015

Although in textbooks asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are viewed as distinct disorders, there is increasing awareness that many patients have features of both. A new review article covers the asthma–COPD overlap syndrome. Approximately 1 in 12 people worldwide are affected by asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD); once regarded as two distinct… Read More…

Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction

Posted by • February 13th, 2015

Asthma or asthma-like conditions can limit the ability of athletes to perform. This article reviews the diagnosis and treatment of asthma and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in athletes. The term exercise-induced bronchoconstriction describes the transient narrowing of the airways after exercise, a phenomenon that occurs frequently among athletes who may not have a diagnosis of asthma or even… Read More…

Allergic Rhinitis

Posted by • January 30th, 2015

Allergic rhinitis is common and is often associated with asthma. Treatment includes intranasal glucocorticoids, oral and nasal antihistamines, leukotriene-receptor antagonists, and, when pharmacotherapy is not effective or produces unacceptable side effects, allergen immunotherapy. Read the latest Clinical Practice review on this topic. The frequency of sensitization to inhalant allergens is increasing and is now more than 40% in… Read More…

Anti–Interleukin-5 Monoclonal Antibody to Treat Severe Eosinophilic Asthma

Posted by • September 24th, 2014

Most asthma patients who come to your pulmonary office get better. With a regimen of inhaled therapies and possibly a short course of oral corticosteroids, the wheeze and cough and shortness of breath remit. But the patient you are seeing in clinic today is still struggling. She’s tried every inhaler at its maximum dose and still… Read More…

Dupilumab as a Treatment for Atopic Dermatitis

Posted by • July 9th, 2014

For thousands of years, our knowledge of medications has largely been based on trial and error: we haphazardly used substances and learned from the effects. Within the last half a century, however, rational drug design slowly took to the forefront as scientific discoveries improved our understanding of the underlying pathogenesis of diseases. While there have… Read More…

Mild Asthma

Posted by • August 9th, 2013

Mild, persistent asthma is common but underdiagnosed and often undertreated. Regular controller treatment with lowdose inhaled glucocorticoids and rescue treatment with short-acting beta2-agonists as needed is recommended initially. Treatment is adjusted on the basis of the response within 3 to 4 months. The latest article in our Clinical Practice series comes from Dr. Elisabeth H…. Read More…

Another Bench-to-Bedside Story in the Treatment of Asthma

Posted by • June 26th, 2013

In the early 20th century, the physician’s toolbox for asthma included adrenergic stimulants and belladonna alkaloids derived from the thorn-apple plant. Fifty years later, corticosteroids were added to the repertoire. (See the NEJM 200th anniversary review article on asthma.) But the next 50 years witnessed much more accelerated changes as basic science advances inspired the… Read More…