Posts Tagged ‘cancer’

The 70-Gene Signature as an Aid to Treatment Decisions in Early Breast Cancer

Posted by • August 24th, 2016

“Your cancer has been successfully removed with surgery, but there may be a role for chemotherapy to protect you in the future.” This message is expressed by oncologists in consulting rooms all over the world. In women with early-stage breast cancer, adjuvant chemotherapy may be offered as an insurance policy against cancer recurrence. Risk of… Read More…

A Boy with a Breast Mass

Posted by • April 22nd, 2016

When evaluating a boy with breast enlargement, diagnostic considerations include gynecomastia, benign breast lesions, and cancer. An 8-year-old boy presented with a mass in the right breast that had been present for 18 months and had enlarged during the previous 6 months. On examination, a firm, mobile mass (2 cm by 2 cm) was present under the… Read More…

A Boy with Abdominal Cramping

Posted by • February 26th, 2016

Colorectal carcinoma is extremely uncommon in children. Hereditary cancer syndromes may confer a predisposition to colorectal carcinoma in children. A 10-year-old boy was seen in the gastroenterology clinic because of abdominal cramping and fevers. Abdominal imaging studies revealed circumferential thickening of a segment of the colonic wall and mesenteric lymphadenopathy. A diagnostic procedure was performed. A new Case… Read More…

Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer

Posted by • February 5th, 2016

Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer is a syndrome that involves an increased predisposition to breast cancer, ovarian cancer, or both and an autosomal dominant pattern of transmission. Risk-reducing mastectomy and risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy are options for the primary prevention of breast and ovarian cancers, and they have been shown in multiple studies to have efficacy. The risk… Read More…

CDX2 as a Prognostic Biomarker in Colon Cancer

Posted by • January 20th, 2016

A few weeks apart, Mr. Green and Mrs. Brown presented to their primary care doctors with intermittent rectal bleeding.  Both were referred for colonoscopies, and each was found to have a colonic mass.  With great trepidation, they awaited the results of the pathology and the CT scans that followed.  Ultimately, both were diagnosed with stage-II… Read More…

A Woman with Proteinuria

Posted by • November 13th, 2015

In a new Case Record of the Massachusetts General Hospital, a 72-year-old woman presented with flank pain, proteinuria, and a new kidney mass. Magnetic resonance imaging of the kidney revealed a complex, solid mass (3 cm x 2.9 cm x 2.9 cm) in the lower pole of the right kidney. Diagnostic tests were performed. Membranous nephropathy,… Read More…

Sentinel node biopsy or nodal observation

Posted by • February 12th, 2014

By the time your patient visited the dermatologist, the dark spot on her back had grown to the size of a dime. She calls you, her long-term doctor, panicked by the biopsy results: melanoma. As you talk her through the diagnosis and what to expect, certain things are clear. Her surgeons will cut out the melanoma… Read More…

Anti–PD-L1 Antibody in Patients with Advanced Cancer

Posted by • June 27th, 2012

In the late 19th century, surgical oncologist William Coley reported the story of a patient with a sarcoma whose disease had gone into complete remission following an untreated strep infection at the site of the tumor.  At the time, Coley – who had recently witnessed the death of a young patient of his own from… Read More…

Watch the NEJM Documentary, Getting Better

Posted by • May 2nd, 2012

In our continuing celebration of 200 years of NEJM, a new documentary is now available on the 200th anniversary website. Getting Better: 200 Years of Medicine is a three-part, 45-minute film that explores three remarkable stories of medical progress that have taken place over the course of the long history of NEJM. When NEJM was founded… Read More…

Prostatectomy

Posted by • May 6th, 2011

After about 13 years of follow-up, men <65 years of age with prostate cancer diagnosed on the basis of obstructive urinary symptoms (rather than elevated prostate-specific antigen levels) and assigned to radical prostatectomy, as compared with watchful waiting, have improved survival.  Bill-Axelson et al. present their findings in an Original Article this week in NEJM. Determining… Read More…