Posts Tagged ‘Clinical Practice’

Adult ADHD

Posted by Sara Fazio • November 15th, 2013

Short-term trials involving adults with ADHD have shown significant improvements in symptoms with stimulants and atomoxetine; however, data on long-term benefits and risks of these medications, particularly among older persons, have been insufficient. The latest article in our Clinical Practice series looks at this topic. ADHD is characterized by symptoms of impulsivity, inattention, and hyperactivity… Read More…

Calcium and Fracture Prevention

Posted by Sara Fazio • October 18th, 2013

The latest article in our Clinical Practice series reviews recommendations regarding calcium intake and uncertainty about benefits as well as potential risks of calcium supplementation. In particular, some studies have suggested an increased cardiovascular risk, but findings have been inconsistent. Both clinicians and patients are likely to be confused by the inconsistent and sometimes conflicting advice… Read More…

Hidradenitis

Posted by Sara Fazio • January 13th, 2012

In the latest article in our Clinical Practice review series, Hidradenitis Suppurativa, a 50-year-old woman presented with fatigue and shortness of breath. Dyspnea after moderate exertion had developed gradually, along with profound malaise and a nonproductive cough. In the 48 hours before admission, her shortness of breath had worsened. Hidradenitis suppurativa is a chronic, recurrent… Read More…

Borderline Personality Disorder

Posted by Graham McMahon • May 27th, 2011

The latest article in our Clinical Practice series, Borderline Personality Disorder, reviews the characteristic features of borderline personality disorder, evidence to indicate genetic and environmental factors in pathogenesis, and effective treatment strategies. BPD is present in about 6% of primary care patients and persons in community-based samples and in 15 to 20% of patients in… Read More…

Tourette’s Syndrome

Posted by Graham McMahon • December 10th, 2010

The latest article in our Clinical Practice series, “Tourette’s Syndrome,” addresses the management of Tourette’s, with attention to cognitive behavioral therapy and pharmacotherapy; the potential role of deep-brain stimulation in severe cases is also discussed. The importance of treating common coexisting conditions is emphasized. Tourette’s syndrome (sometimes called Tourette’s disorder) is a childhood-onset condition characterized… Read More…

Retinal-Vein Occlusion

Posted by Graham McMahon • November 26th, 2010

The latest article in our Clinical Practice series, “Retinal-Vein Occlusion,” comes from Dr. Tien Wong of the Singapore Eye Research Institute and the Centre for Eye Research Australia, and Dr. Ingrid Scott from the Penn State Hershey Eye Center. Retinal-vein occlusion is a common cause of vision loss in older persons, and the second most… Read More…

Recurrent Miscarriage

Posted by Graham McMahon • October 29th, 2010

The latest article in our Clinical Practice series, “Recurrent Miscarriage,” comes from Drs. D. Ware Branch, Mark Gibson, and Robert M. Silver at the University of Utah Health Sciences Center. Recurrent miscarriage, defined as the loss of three or more consecutive pregnancies, occurs in approximately 1% of couples attempting to bear children. Clinical Pearls • Should… Read More…

Nausea and Vomiting in Pregnancy

Posted by Graham McMahon • October 15th, 2010

The latest article in our Clinical Practice series, “Nausea and Vomiting in Pregnancy,” comes from Jennifer R. Niebyl, M.D., from the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. About 50% of women have nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy, and an additional 25% have nausea alone. The popular term “morning sickness” is a misnomer, as it… Read More…

Kidney Stones

Posted by Graham McMahon • September 3rd, 2010

The latest article in our Clinical Practice series, Calcium Kidney Stones, comes to you from Drs. Elaine Worcester and Fredric Coe at the University of Chicago. In the United States, the prevalence of kidney stones has risen over the past 30 years. By 70 years of age, 11.0% of men and 5.6% of women will… Read More…

Emergency Treatment of Asthma

Posted by Graham McMahon • August 20th, 2010

Our latest article in the Clinical Practice series, Emergency Treatment of Asthma, comes from Stephen C. Lazarus, M.D., at the University of California, San Francisco. Asthma is one of the most common diseases in developing countries and has a worldwide prevalence of 7 to 10%. It is also a common cause of urgent care and… Read More…