Posts Tagged ‘Diabetes’

Origins of Obesity in Early Childhood

Posted by Joann Schulte • January 29th, 2014

Adults who stuff their mouths with the wrong foods and don’t move their muscles often gain weight and may develop health problems such as obesity and diabetes as a consequence. Now there’s new evidence about how this scenario applies to children. In kindergarten, more than one in four U.S. children is overweight or obese, according… Read More…

Bardoxolone Methyl in Type 2 Diabetes and Stage 4 Chronic Kidney Disease

Posted by Daniela Lamas • December 26th, 2013

Intuitively, controlling diabetic kidney disease should be easy – manage hyperglycemia, manage blood pressure. And the more control, the better, right? Unfortunately, it hasn’t been so simple. With effective treatment of hyperglycemia and control of blood pressure, the incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) due to diabetes has reached a plateau in the past 10… Read More…

Poorly Controlled Diabetes Mellitus and Fatigue

Posted by Sara Fazio • May 31st, 2013

In the latest Case Record from the Massachusetts General Hospital, a 56-year-old woman with diabetes mellitus was admitted to the hospital because of hyperglycemia and chest pain. Approximately 4 years earlier, a chest radiograph showed a solitary pulmonary nodule in the right upper lobe. The differential diagnosis for uncontrolled diabetes includes undertreatment or misdiagnosis of… Read More…

Infective Endocarditis

Posted by Sara Fazio • April 13th, 2013

Diagnosis of endocarditis is usually based on clinical, microbiologic, and echocardiographic findings. Treatment involves antimicrobial therapy targeted to the identified organism. Surgical indications include heart failure, uncontrolled infection, and prevention of embolic events. The latest article in our Clinical Practice series reviews diagnosis and treatment options for infective endocarditis. Infective endocarditis has an estimated annual… Read More…

Two Steps Ahead? Bariatric Surgery for Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes

Posted by Rena Xu • August 22nd, 2012

Imagine you’re trying to convince a severely obese middle-aged man to lose weight.  You recite a litany of morbid conditions associated with obesity; prominent on the list is Type 2 diabetes (T2D). “But I don’t have diabetes,” the patient counters. “What would weight loss do for me?” For patients like him, you explain, losing weight… Read More…

Vote for the Most Important NEJM Article (1970-1979)

Posted by Karen Buckley • May 24th, 2012

What was the most important medical advance reported in NEJM between 1970 and 1979?  There are seven days left in this round.  Vote now! In a 1970 article, Drs. Swan, Ganz and colleagues described a new device for measuring pressures in the right side of the heart and pulmonary capillary wedge. Until then, rigid catheters were… Read More…

Medical Therapy vs. Bariatric Surgery in Type 2 Diabetes

Posted by Daniela Lamas • April 27th, 2012

In the 91 years since the discovery of insulin therapy for diabetes by Banting and Best in 1921, the prevalence of type 1 and especially type 2 diabetes has skyrocketed, tied to the ongoing epidemic of obesity. With the global prevalence of type 2 diabetes now expected to hit nearly 10 percent of the world’s… Read More…

Diabetic Retinopathy

Posted by Sara Fazio • March 30th, 2012

The incidence of diabetes is increasing, but that of diabetic retinopathy is falling, probably owing to better management of glucose levels, lipid abnormalities, and hypertension. Clinical trials of VEGF and PPAR-α inhibitors are improving vision and providing insights into pathogenesis.  The latest article in our Mechanisms of Disease review series, “Diabetic Retinopathy,” comes from Drs…. Read More…

Panretinal Photocoagulation

Posted by Graham McMahon • October 21st, 2011

In the latest article in our Clinical Therapeutics review series, proliferative retinopathy develops in a 55-year-old man with type 2 diabetes. Panretinal photocoagulation, which causes reduced production of VEGF by destroying hypoxic retinal cells, is recommended. Diminished peripheral and night vision can occur. Data from the Diabetic Retinopathy Study indicate that approximately half of all… Read More…

Olmesartan for Patients with Diabetes

Posted by Graham McMahon • March 11th, 2011

In the Original Article, Olmesartan for the Delay or Prevention of Microalbuminuria in Type 2 Diabetes, Haller et al. investigated whether an angiotensin-receptor blocker (olmesartan) would delay microalbuminuria in patients with type 2 diabetes and normoalbuminuria. Olmesartan was associated with a delayed onset of microalbuminuria, even though blood pressure control in both groups was excellent…. Read More…