Revitalized NEJM.org Serves Up a More Intuitive Search Experience

Posted by • February 15th, 2018

Welcome back to our tour of the revitalized NEJM.org. In Parts 1–3 of our series, we explored the many new pathways you now have for quickly and easily finding all the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) content of interest to you at any given time.

If you’re more of a searcher than a browser, we have good news for you too. No matter where you are on NEJM.org, a looking-glass icon (always appearing near the top right-hand corner of your screen on desktop and near the three-line menu item on article pages or mobile) offers instant access to full site search.

The same curation, classification, and tagging of content that enables NEJM to show you related content in many different ways also helps to power relevant search results at NEJM.org.

Similar to how global search engines work, you can also expect to see a reimagined presentation of popular/suggested keyword combinations appearing in real time as you compose searches at NEJM.org.

FILTER AND SORT RESULTS HOW YOU WANT THEM

By default, NEJM.org search results are sorted by most relevant based on same and similar keywords appearing in article headlines and texts, but you can also easily re-sort your results by Oldest or Most Cited.

The revitalized NEJM.org now also offers you an ability to filter search results on multiple criteria at the same time. These criteria include: medical specialty, article type, and publication date — choose from four pre-built time filters or create your own custom date range.

While default search results show you all relevant NEJM articles, the tab at the top of each search results page continues to enable easy segregation of relevant multimedia, including videos, figures, illustrations, audio discussions, and more.

FIND CME FAST, SAVE SEARCHES, AND DIVE DEEPER

Ticking the CME box at the top of a search results page enables you to instantly isolate relevant activities, such as exams or Interactive Medical Cases (IMCs), that you can complete to earn credits toward annual CME, and in some cases, ABIM MOC requirements.

A convenient SAVE button on each search results page enables you to store and return later to the results via your My Account panel at NEJM.org.

If you’d like to conduct a more targeted search, you can click the Advanced Search link, which appears to the right of the main search box and offers prebuilt options for building more complex search queries, including exact-phrase searches, keyword AND combinations (choose the ‘All the words’ option), and keyword exclusions (use the ‘Without the words’ field).

For more on getting the most from your search experience at NEJM.org, see our detailed Tips for search page, and be sure to tune in for Part 5 of our tour series in which we’ll explore the new Multimedia and Learning content channels at NEJM.org.

If you have had time to explore the new site and would like to recommend a topic for our tour series, please do so by email message.

 

 

Quickly and Easily Find on NEJM.org the Information That’s Relevant to You

Posted by • February 9th, 2018

When you are grappling with a difficult or unusual clinical case, researching a paper, or preparing for a teaching or research presentation, the revitalized NEJM.org makes it easy for you discover all that the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) has to offer.

In Part 1 of our tour series we looked at the updated design for readability, enhanced discoverability of content, and user-centric site navigation. In Part 2 we explored the new Article Tools that make it easier to read, save, download, cite, share, obtain rights to reuse, view articles metrics, and more.

Here in Part 3 of our tour series, we focus on the many ways to browse and discover related NEJM content. In addition to a more reader-centric navigation, every article page now features multiple jumping off points for discovering additional, related content.

WHAT’S NEW

If your objective at the moment is keeping current with medical knowledge, look to the new articles carousel at the top of each article page, which features convenient links to all of the most recently published NEJM articles.

WHAT’S RELATED (SPECIFICALLY)

The Related Articles module reveals NEJM editorial and other supplemental materials associated with the article you are currently viewing.

WHAT’S SIMILAR

If you are limited for time, you might choose to focus only on certain types of NEJM articles.  For example, you might wish to isolate just research. Or perhaps you’re interested in reviews, clinical cases, or commentary. There is a module that shows articles of the same type you are currently viewing. Clicking the title of the module will take you to a page that aggregates all available articles of the same type. The default is to show articles in order of publication (newest first), but you will also find options for filtering by Specialty, Article Type, and date (past 6 months, past 1 year, past 2 years, past 5 years, or your own custom range).

With two clicks, you can also change the sort order to show newest, oldest, most viewed, and most cited. Each article result also features convenient tools for saving to your My Account panel or downloading for personal use.

If you like browsing NEJM.org by article type, a shortcut to achieve the same result is to click on any of the red, all-caps headers that appear just above NEJM article headlines.

WHAT’S TRENDING

For physicians and health care professionals wishing to stay up to date on the most important new medical knowledge, there is time savings in paying attention to what is trending among your medical colleagues worldwide. The Most Viewed content module on NEJM.org offers a one-click gateway to the 10 NEJM articles that are the most:

  • Viewed — either in the latest week or month
  • Emailed — in the latest week
  • Cited — either most recently or throughout NEJM history
  • Most covered in the media over the past 30 days

WHAT’S RELATED (BY MEDICAL AREA)

At the bottom of each article page you will find clickable grey tags that take you to content that has been classified similarly in terms of specialty and topics of interest.

WHAT ELSE WAS RELEVANT AT THE TIME AN ARTICLE FIRST CAME OUT

Finally, also at the bottom of each article page, you will find a new carousel containing all the articles, editorials, and other content that were published in the same week as the article you are currently viewing.

MENU ICON ON ARTICLE PAGE

If browsing (versus searching for) articles, there is one additional new navigation feature you will want to know about. While you can always return to the homepage by clicking on the NEJM logo in the upper left corner of your screen, you can also now bring up the site main navigation menu by clicking on the three-line menu icon near the top right corner of article pages (to the right of search and just below the red Subscribe button).

Be sure to tune in for Part 4 in our tour series in which we delve into improved and expanded capabilities for search on the revitalized NEJM.org.

On the New NEJM.org, There’s a Tool for That!

Posted by • February 2nd, 2018

Welcome back for Part 2 in our blog tour of all the ways the revitalized NEJM.org makes it faster and easier for you to discover, experience, and make use of the most compelling and professionally relevant medical research available from the New England Journal of Medicine.

In Part 1 of our series, we looked at the revitalized site’s design for readability, discoverability of new content, and user-centric site navigation. Here in Part 2, we look at all the new and enhanced Article Tools that make it easier to read and learn from NEJM and to use NEJM content in your own professional, academic, and lifelong learning pursuits.

NAVIGATE WITHIN ARTICLES, SAVE, DOWNLOAD, AND MORE

When you visit NEJM.org, a new set of Article Tools now appears to the left of your screen. For convenience, the toolbar follows you as scroll down through an article.

Either rolling or hovering over a symbol in the toolbar yields a popup description of what the tool does. Clicking on a tool either executes its task or exposes more options.

For example, clicking on the new in-article navigation tool exposes a comprehensive list of available places within the article to which you can jump instantly. It also offers instant access to all other articles that have cited the NEJM-published research (as documented by Crossref) plus any related letters to the editor that NEJM has published.

Article Save and Download tools do just what you expect them to. Note that to save articles of interest to your NEJM.org account, you must be signed in. Downloading an article generates a convenient and easy-to-print PDF version for personal and other limited uses.

Social media sharing options for NEJM articles have now been consolidated under a single new Share tool, which connects instantly to Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and LinkedIn. It also offers options for sharing via email and copying an article’s URL for sharing via text message or other means.

JUMP RIGHT INTO RELATED CME

What better time to complete and earn credits for a directly related CME activity than just after you have finished reading and contemplating an NEJM article of interest?

If there is an NEJM CME activity available based on an article you are reading at NEJM.org, a CME option will appear in the article toolbar. Your successful completion of the activity will be automatically recorded and a downloadable certificate will be added in your My Account panel at NEJM.org.

If you are ABIM-certified, successful completion of related Interactive Medical Cases (IMCs) will also earn you ABIM MOC points, and will be reported automatically to relevant systems, again as long as you are logged in and have entered your unique ABIM ID number to your account.

PERMISSION TO REUSE NEJM CONTENT

While Article Save and Download tools support personal use of NEJM content, the Permissions Article tool takes you directly into the RightsLink management system where you can apply for and/or purchase rights to reuse NEJM content for a large variety of non-personal uses.

GRAB PREFORMATTED ARTICLE CITATIONS, SLIDES, AND MORE

The ellipsis symbol on the new Article toolbar brings you more options.  You can Download Citations in a wide variety of commonly required formats – RIS, EndNote, BibTex, Medlars, ProCite, RefWorks, and Reference Manager.

You can Download Slides, a quick and easy way to obtain distilled versions of article essentials plus figures, illustrations, and so forth for use in presentations or as study guides for medical students. This capability is available to NEJM subscribers and also to non-subscribers on all freely available NEJM articles.

You can also set Article Alerts, so you will be aware of any new activity related to an NEJM article of interest.

TOGGLE TO FIGURES/MEDIA AND VIEW ARTICLE METRICS

Virtually all NEJM research articles come packaged with charts, data tables, images, illustrations, and other related graphics. Those graphic elements are now available to readers both from within NEJM articles and, for easier viewing, via a new Figures/Media tab atop each article page.

Quick metrics such as numbers of references, citing articles, and related Letters to the Editor also appear at the top of each article view along with a convenient link to the more in-depth metrics tracked and reported by NEJM for each article it publishes.

Be sure to tune in for Part 3 of our tour in which we dive into improved capabilities for easily and quickly discovering relevant NEJM content of interest via search.

Take the Case Challenge: A Newborn with Thrombocytopenia, Cataracts, and Hepatosplenomegaly

Posted by • January 26th, 2018

A newborn boy was transferred to the neonatal intensive care unit (ICU) because of thrombocytopenia and abnormal results on an eye examination for red reflex and on a hearing screening. What is the most likely diagnosis?

Read the case description. Then vote and comment about what the diagnosis may be and what diagnostic tests will prove useful. Find the answers in the full text of the case to be published on March 9.  Follow the conversation on Facebook and Twitter with #NEJMCases.

Experience NEJM.org Faster and More Easily than Ever Before

Posted by • January 25th, 2018

There are three things we know about readers of the New England Journal Medicine. You:

  • Are lifelong medical learners who care deeply about advancing medicine through rigorous, evidence-based research.
  • Lead exceptionally busy lives.
  • Wake up every day to an extraordinary array of new information – medical and otherwise – clamoring for your attention.

These three facts have informed virtually every decision we’ve made in designing the revitalized NEJM.org.

This blog series offers a tour of the many new site features that now simplify your discovery, experience, and use of the preeminent medical content published each week by the New England Journal of Medicine.

A CLEAN, MODERN LOOK

The first thing you will notice upon arriving at the revitalized NEJM.org is a contemporary new look and feel. Each design element – layout, typography, colors, images, and even white space – has been chosen for its contribution to enhanced readability. The new NEJM.org is easy on the eyes and even more optimized than before for viewing across all types of desktop and mobile devices.

ALL NEW CONTENT FRONT AND CENTER  

NEJM editors consider thousands of medical studies each year, rigorously evaluate, and select only the most important and best for publication. The NEJM.org homepage, plus specialty and topic-focused landing pages, are designed to ensure that you don’t miss a single new article of interest

INTUITIVE NAVIGATION

The revitalized NEJM.org also reflects a shift to a more user-centric navigation structure. Improved primary navigation provides easy ways to locate current and past NEJM issues, browse by topic or medical specialty, and to explore the new NEJM.org Learning and Multimedia channels (we’ll tour both in greater depth in future posts).

Each article page also features multiple adjacent content modules that aggregate and offer fast navigation to related NEJM content.

That’s not all. The revitalized NEJM.org also introduces a new tool for in-article navigation. This enables readers to jump easily from within one section of an article to another. Tune in for Part 2 in our series where we will explore the Article Tools in detail.

New Interactive Medical Case: “In the Balance”

Posted by • January 19th, 2018

A 71-year-old man presented to the emergency department with a 3-day history of changes in mental status. His partner noted that the patient had become more irritable than usual and was behaving as if other people were in the room with him when no one else was present. The patient had also had several episodes of uncontrollable laughter for no apparent reason.

On presentation, the patient appeared to be intermittently confused about where he was and at times displayed increased talkativeness and incoherent speech. He also appeared to be unstable while standing or walking, and his partner reported that the patient had had several falls, without injury to his head.

Test your diagnostic and therapeutic skills with this Interactive Medical Case! Video, animation, and interactive content allow you to receive feedback on your choices made based on a series of questions and exercises, review the condition and optimal treatment steps involved in a complex evolving patient history, and earn CME credit or MOC points.

You can also browse through a list of 49 previous Interactive Medical Cases and polish your skills in a wide range of medical scenarios.

New Clinical Decisions article: Management of Sentinel-Node Metastasis in Melanoma

Posted by • January 16th, 2018

In a new Clinical Decisions article, Ms. Evans, 52-year-old woman, awaits an assessment of her recent diagnosis of melanoma. She had initially presented to her primary care physician 6 weeks earlier with an irregular lesion on her right arm. After a punch biopsy, a superficial spreading melanoma was diagnosed. She was referred to a surgical oncologist for consultation and subsequently underwent wide local excision of the primary lesion and an axillary sentinel lymph-node biopsy.

Ms. Evans is visiting your clinic today to review the pathological findings and to determine the next steps in care. As the next step, would you recommend a completion lymph-node dissection, or an observation of the nodes using ultrasonography? Read more about this case, form your opinion as to which option will be more effective, and take a quick poll on which option you would choose.

Clinical Decisions are a great way to help you evaluate treatment options and gain insight from colleagues. The articles include a case vignette, plus clinically acceptable management options, each supported in a short commentary by a respected clinician. You are invited to vote for, and comment on, the options at NEJM.org, where a diverse range of thinking is presented. Browse previous Clinical Decisions articles here!

 

New Interactive Medical Case: “The Road Less Traveled”

Posted by • September 25th, 2017

A 26-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with a 1-week history of worsening pleuritic chest pain. She recalled the development of a dull, substernal ache several days after a 5-hour flight home from Puerto Rico, where she had spent 3 weeks hiking in national parks and exploring several caves.

The ache progressed over the ensuing days to a constant, stabbing pain that worsened with deep inspiration and coughing. She had not taken any medication for the pain. The patient reported no fevers, chills, shortness of breath, wheezing, sputum production, hemoptysis, weight loss, night sweats, leg swelling, or diarrhea and no changes in appetite or urinary habits. She had no history of venous thromboembolism, cancer, or environmental or drug allergies and did not use oral contraceptives.

Test your diagnostic and therapeutic skills with this Interactive Medical Case! Video, animation, and interactive content allow you to receive feedback on your choices made based on a series of questions and exercises, review the condition and optimal treatment steps involved in a complex evolving patient history, and earn CME credit or MOC points.

You can also browse through a list of 47 previous Interactive Medical Cases and polish your skills in a wide range of medical scenarios.

New Interactive Medical Case: “All That Wheezes”

Posted by • August 3rd, 2017

A 20-year-old woman with a history of allergic rhinitis presented to her physician in the autumn with persistent cough and shortness of breath. She had been seen 6 weeks earlier for nasal congestion, rhinorrhea, postnasal drip, and cough that had bothered her on and off throughout the summer. Her symptoms occurred at home and at work. Just recently she had begun to have shortness of breath while walking to the bus stop.

During coughing episodes, she could hear herself wheezing. Her grandmother’s albuterol inhaler had given her some relief from wheezing at night. The nasal congestion abated when she used fluticasone nasal spray and loratadine, but the cough persisted. The patient reported no fevers, chills, sputum production, headache, joint or muscle aches, heartburn, nausea, vomiting, or frequent throat clearing.

Test your diagnostic and therapeutic skills with this free Interactive Medical Case! Video, animation, and interactive content allow you to receive feedback on your choices made based on a series of questions and exercises, review the condition and optimal treatment steps involved in a complex evolving patient history, and earn CME credit or MOC points.

You can also browse through a list of 47 previous Interactive Medical Cases and polish your skills in a wide range of medical scenarios.

New Clinical Decisions Article: Management of Septic Shock

Posted by • June 19th, 2017

The newest addition to our Clinical Decisions series gives you a chance to decide how you would treat Ms. Jones, a 65-year-old woman with a history of hypertension who has come to the emergency room after experiencing 3 days of chills and dysuria. After checking vital signs, conducting a physical examination and urinalysis, you make a preliminary diagnosis of sepsis, specifically coming from a urinary source. Once the patient has been stabilized, you must decide which of the two given treatments for septic shock leave her with the best chance of survival. In one method, treatment would continue under the early, goal-directed therapy (EGDT) protocol, and, in the other, by continuous intravenous administration of antibiotics and vasopressors, guided by measurement of clinical signs. Read more about this case, form your opinion as to which option will be more effective and share your thoughts here.

Clinical Decisions are a great way to help you evaluate treatment options and gain insight from colleagues. The articles include a case vignette, plus clinically acceptable management options, each supported in a short commentary by a respected clinician. You are invited to vote for, and comment on, the options at NEJM.org, where a diverse range of thinking is presented. Browse previous Clinical Decisions articles here!