About Lisa Rosenbaum

Lisa Rosenbaum

All posts by Lisa Rosenbaum

Resident Work Hours and the FIRST Trial Results

• February 4th, 2016

Resident duty hours mean something different for everyone. Listen to residents, program directors, investigators, and ethicists discuss the results of the newly published FIRST trial, “National Cluster-Randomized Trial of Duty-Hour Flexibility in Surgical Training,” and its implications for the future of resident education. You’ll hear from the principal investigator of FIRST, Karl Bilimoria, David Asch, principal… Read More…


Therapy in Youth with Type 2 Diabetes

• June 13th, 2012

Just twenty years ago only 3 of 100 adolescents with diabetes had Type 2 diabetes (T2DM); today that proportion nears 1 in 2. Moreover, this epidemic of T2DM disproportionately affects disadvantaged children, many of whom grow up in environments that lack healthy food options or safe exercise facilities. Though it is clearly urgent to devise medical, behavioral,… Read More…


Reproductive Technologies and the Birth Defect Risk

• May 9th, 2012

The constant publication of clinical trials may give the impression that for every question, there is an answer. The reality, however, is that many clinical questions do not lend themselves to investigation in a randomized, controlled fashion. Whether assisted reproductive technology causes an increased rate of birth defects is one such question. Although for some… Read More…


CT Angiography for Safe Discharge of Patients

• April 11th, 2012

Chest pain is the second most common reason for Emergency Room visits in this country, and although only 10-15% of patients admitted with chest pain are ultimately diagnosed with an acute coronary syndrome, the majority of patients get admitted. So common, in fact, is this admission diagnosis, that during cardiology rounds the other week, when… Read More…


Tenecteplase vs. Alteplase for Ischemic Stroke

• March 21st, 2012

Though, for clinicians, ordering a drug these days is as simple as a click of a button, for the drug, getting to within reach of our fingertips is no easy feat. Most drugs fail in early phases of testing, and those that eventually reach our clinical armamentarium have spent years getting there. Rarely do we… Read More…


Donepezil and Memantine for Alzheimer’s Disease

• March 7th, 2012

All of us who have completed an internship are well-familiar with the poly-pharmacy-discharge challenge. The patient comes in on eight medications. Now it’s time to go home, and you’ve gone and added another four. Surely the patient doesn’t need all of these, but as you review her list, it’s not clear that any can be… Read More…


Prehospital Control of Status Epilepticus

• February 15th, 2012

Anyone who has ever been challenged to start an IV in a patient having a seizure knows why depending upon intravenous lorazepam to terminate status epilepticus is not ideal. Terminating a seizure as quickly as possible is imperative, as the longer a patient seizes, the more difficult it becomes to terminate with pharmacotherapy. The knowledge… Read More…


Cardiac Arrest during Long-Distance Running Races

• January 11th, 2012

As legend has it, in 490 BC, when the Greeks defeated the Persians at the battlefield known as Marathon, the Greek messenger Pheidippides was sent to Athens to announce the victory. He ran the entire 26.22 miles. The marathon was born. But Pheidippides dropped dead. More than two millennia later, in the US, about two… Read More…


Niacin in Patients with Low HDL Receiving Statins

• December 14th, 2011

A 65 year-old man with known coronary disease comes to your office seeking advice. He had his first MI at age 56, had PCI at the time, and has been medically managed since. His LDL is below 70 on 40 mg of simvastatin, but his HDL has always been stubbornly low, hovering in the low… Read More…


Childhood Adiposity and Cardiovascular Risk

• November 16th, 2011

Childhood obesity has reached epidemic proportions, and has moved beyond public health discourse and onto the public stage. No doubt, efforts to prevent and treat childhood obesity are critical. But in the face of highly visible social campaigns -from school lunch reform to the elimination of “food deserts,” it can be tough to tell where… Read More…