About Sushrut Jangi

Sushrut Jangi

All posts by Sushrut Jangi

Medicine in the Air – A Report on In-Flight Emergencies

• May 29th, 2013

On a recent flight back to Boston, the woman sitting next to me began to have a panic attack about half an hour before we landed. “Can’t deal with turbulence,” she whimpered, grasping my arm.   She closed her eyes and began to mumble a prayer. “It’ll be okay,” I said, trying to talk her down,… Read More…


Measuring Pain using Functional MRI

• April 10th, 2013

The moment we find a useful biomarker, our ability to manage a condition improves: we treat diabetes by following the glycemic index, we treat HIV by following a viral load and a CD4 count. Conditions without biomarkers often frustrate treatment – after all, like the business adage – “you can’t manage what you don’t measure.”… Read More…


Norovirus Steals the Crown from Rotavirus

• March 20th, 2013

A decade ago, if a young child with profuse diarrhea and vomiting was brought into the pediatrician’s office, the doctor would think immediately: rotavirus. No longer, says Daniel Payne, author of a new study in NEJM this week. According to their results, norovirus has displaced rotavirus as the predominant cause of acute infectious gastroenteritis in children…. Read More…


Antisepsis in the ICU – Chlorhexadine and Patient Bathing

• February 6th, 2013

When I was an intern in the ICU, there were only a few minutes in the early mornings to examine patients before the attending arrived to hear our presentations.  During those frantic moments, I frequently walked into a patient’s room to find the nurses bathing the patients with a wash-cloth.  “Come back in a bit,”… Read More…


Doctors Turned Ecologists: Infusion of Donor Feces for Recurrent C. Difficile

• January 30th, 2013

The Ecology of the Gut During birth, the fetus emerges into the world almost completely sterile of bacterial life. But the end of the first day, the baby has been held to her mother’s breast, has been lifted by nurses and doctors, has taken the first breaths of the air in the maternity ward, and… Read More…


An Interview with Ezra Barzilay – The Cholera Epidemic in Haiti, 2010-2012

• January 9th, 2013

In October of 2010, less than a year after a devastating earthquake struck Haiti, the country was plagued with a deadly cholera epidemic.   Within days of the first case, a National Cholera Surveillance System was set up to direct the country’s public health response.   The report from the first two years of the cholera epidemic… Read More…


Finding a Genetic Explanation for Stillbirth

• December 5th, 2012

Within the word “stillbirth” is almost unbearable contradiction, an image of immobility and silence when what we expect is rigorous movement, a loud and explosive cry, a rapid and hammering heartbeat, all the physical warmth of new life.  Parents who confront a stillborn child are forced to deal with the viscerality of this contradiction, requiring… Read More…


A Mumps Outbreak that Shows the Vaccine is Still Working

• November 5th, 2012

Recently, New York City suffered flooding, fires, power outages, and many deaths after a superstorm that cycled into the city from the Atlantic.  Throughout history, cities particularly suffer from singular natural or man-made events because of their population density.  Crowded conditions also make cities rife ground for the transmission of contagious disease – yellow fever,… Read More…


Linezolid in XDR – Useful to an Extent

• October 18th, 2012

A few hours north of Durban, South Africa, the little town of Tugela Ferry sits in the shadow of the rugged mountains that run alongside the Indian Ocean.  There are few roads here, gaps in the electrical grid, and a paucity of running water.   The main hospital in town – the three-hundred-and-fifty bed Church of… Read More…


BG-12: The Changing Landscape of Multiple Sclerosis Therapy

• September 19th, 2012

Multiple sclerosis (MS) remains a leading cause of neurologic disability in the young.  MS usually relapses and remits before entering a progressive phase. We still don’t know the precipitating cause of MS – consequently we have no cure.  Our best approach right now is to try to reduce relapse rate by using drugs that we… Read More…