Posts Tagged ‘cardiac surgery’

Tranexamic Acid in Patients Undergoing Coronary-Artery Surgery

Posted by • December 7th, 2016

On the first day of my second year of residency, I showed up to the cardiac surgery intensive care unit (CSICU) terrified for what awaited me.  It wasn’t uncommon for patients recovering from cardiac surgery to be on three different vasopressors while intubated with four chest tubes and pacing wires. Even after a year of… Read More…

Coronary-Artery Bypass Grafting

Posted by • May 20th, 2016

Appropriate selection of patients for coronary-artery bypass grafting (CABG) is critical to ensure good outcomes. The evaluation of patients for CABG relies on a systematic assessment of the characteristics and coronary anatomy known to be associated with a survival benefit from CABG as compared with medical therapy or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). There is increasing… Read More…

Rate Control versus Rhythm Control for Atrial Fibrillation after Cardiac Surgery

Posted by • May 18th, 2016

Whether you are a resident on the cardiology, surgery, or general medicine service, encountering patients with atrial fibrillation is common. Many patients, particularly after cardiac surgery, go in and out of atrial fibrillation so often that residents caring for them often ignore the blinking lights and loud alarms from telemetry machines after a while. However,… Read More…

Remote Ischemic Preconditioning in Cardiac Surgery

Posted by • October 7th, 2015

In a lab at Duke University in 1986, scientists conducted an experiment comparing two different ways to give a dog a heart attack. The investigators cut off the blood flow of the circumflex artery for 40 minutes in 12 dogs. For 7 of those dogs, they first initiated a “preconditioning” protocol that consisted of four 5-minute… Read More…

Effects of Red-Cell Storage Duration on Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery

Posted by • April 8th, 2015

“Age,” the great boxer Muhammad Ali famously said, “is whatever you think it is. You are as old as you think you are.” The role that aging plays in vitality, strength, and wisdom has long been debated, but more recently the question of whether younger is better has been raised about red blood cells.  Currently, blood… Read More…

Cold Steel or Caged Balloon? The ASCERT Study Adds to the Revascularization Rivalry

Posted by • April 18th, 2012

Mac versus PC, Republicans versus Democrats, chocolate versus vanilla … life is full of rivalries, and the world of medicine is no exception. Take cardiology and cardiac surgery, for example. Who’s better at mending a particular group of blood-starved hearts? The answer depends on the group of hearts – and perhaps on the group you ask…. Read More…