Posts Tagged ‘cardiogenic shock’

A Man with Cardiogenic Shock

Posted by • September 25th, 2015

In a new Case Record of the Massachusetts General Hospital, a 50-year-old man with a history of cardiomyopathy and progressive muscle weakness was admitted with cardiogenic shock. Electroencephalography showed total suppression of cerebral activity; ventilator support was withdrawn, and he died. An autopsy was performed. Myotonic dystrophy is the most common muscular dystrophy in adults and most… Read More…

Scorpion Envenomation

Posted by • August 1st, 2014

Each year more than a million cases of scorpion envenomation occur worldwide, causing substantial morbidity and, among children, a risk of death. A new brief review discusses the effects and treatment of scorpion envenomation. Every year, more than 1 million cases of scorpion envenomation are reported worldwide. Although the resultant mortality is lower than that… Read More…

Missing Elements of the History

Posted by • February 7th, 2014

In our latest Clinical Problem-Solving article, a 59-year-old woman with a history of bilateral total hip replacements and a total knee replacement sees her physician for cough, exertional dyspnea, and foot swelling that had developed 2 weeks earlier while she was on vacation in Europe. New-onset heart failure, particularly in younger patients who do not have… Read More…

Shocking News: Intraaortic Balloon Pumps May Not Help in Myocardial Infarction with Cardiogenic Shock

Posted by • October 3rd, 2012

Your patient is in trouble.  He has just suffered a myocardial infarction; now his systolic blood pressure is below 90, his skin is clammy, his urine output is minimal, and he is in respiratory distress. What should you do? Recognizing that he is in cardiogenic shock, you consider using an intraaortic balloon pump (IABP). International guidelines… Read More…

Comparison of Dopamine and Norepinephrine in the Treatment of Shock

Posted by • March 3rd, 2010

This week, De Backer et al. report on a multicenter clinical trial in which they randomly assigned 1679 patients with shock to receive either dopamine or norepinephrine to restore and maintain blood pressure. With regard to the primary endpoint of 28-day mortality, there was no difference between the two pressors. However, dopamine was unexpectedly associated… Read More…