Posts Tagged ‘dermatology’

A Man with Cloudy Vision

Posted by • July 1st, 2016

Syphilis can cause uveitis and retinitis. The uveitis can be anterior, posterior, or both (panuveitis) and can occur with or without a hypopyon (usually without). A 50-year-old man with psoriatic arthritis and HIV infection presented with cloudy vision, decreased hearing, and gait instability. Two months earlier, the patient had begun taking antiretroviral medications. A diagnostic test result was… Read More…

A Man with a Pruritic Rash

Posted by • June 24th, 2016

Although human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus, it seems to induce a precancerous state that can lead to adult T-cell leukemia–lymphoma (a subtype of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma), instead of being directly carcinogenic. HTLV-1 is associated with a long latency period, and most affected patients are exposed to the virus early in life…. Read More…

Eye of the Beholder

Posted by • May 6th, 2016

Dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and necrotizing autoimmune myopathy all cause proximal muscle weakness. Proximal weakness is often progressive, with patients reporting difficulty in raising their arms above their head, climbing stairs, or standing from a seated position. Clinically, dermatomyositis is distinguished from polymyositis and necrotizing autoimmune myopathy by its distinctive dermal findings. A 47-year-old man presented to an… Read More…

Uncomplicated Skin Abscess

Posted by • March 4th, 2016

Between 1993 and 2005, annual emergency department visits for skin and soft-tissue infections in the United States increased from 1.2 million to 3.4 million, primarily because of an increased incidence of abscesses. The primary treatment of a cutaneous abscess is drainage. Whether adjunctive antibiotics lead to improved outcomes in patients with uncomplicated abscesses or just… Read More…

A Woman with a Skin Ulcer

Posted by • February 12th, 2016

Ulceroglandular tularemia is one of several clinical presentations of Francisella tularensis infection. In patients with ulceroglandular tularemia, an ulcer develops at the site of inoculation and is followed by fever, systemic symptoms, and regional lymphadenopathy. Although tularemia can occur year-round, it predominantly occurs during the summer months. The diagnosis of tularemia is quite rare; in… Read More…

A Complementary Affair

Posted by • January 8th, 2016

What is the most common type of cryoglobulinemia associated with Sjögren’s syndrome? Sjögren’s syndrome, a systemic autoimmune disease that is characterized by diminished lacrimal-gland and salivary-gland function, is one of the most common connective-tissue diseases. Decreased glandular function leads to typical manifestations of dry eyes and dry mouth, or sicca complex. Although the disease typically follows… Read More…