Posts Tagged ‘FEV1’

Origins of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Posted by • September 1st, 2016

The conventional thinking about chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is that exposures in adult life, such as smoking, lead to a low FEV1:FVC ratio, the physiological hallmark of COPD (a frequent cause of illness and death). Although smoking is still considered a major culprit, it is now known that genetic, environmental, and developmental factors that… Read More…

COPD Is Not the Whole Story

Posted by • May 11th, 2016

Many diagnostic guidelines use black or white parameters – either patients meet the criteria and have the disease, or they don’t. While guidelines like this can be useful for developing clear definitions, in practice many patients fall within a gray area. The current diagnosis of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), for example, relies on spirometry… Read More…

Loss of FEV1 and the pathogenesis of COPD

Posted by • July 8th, 2015

For years, the dominant model for the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been that exposure to particulate matter (usually tobacco smoke) leads to a rapid decline in lung function, i.e., more than 40ml of FEV1 per year. This paradigm has recently come into question, but a careful study to test this model… Read More…

Tiotropium and the ancient datura plant: Revisiting the role of antimuscarinic therapy in asthma

Posted by • September 6th, 2012

For centuries the datura plant has been used for treatment of respiratory disease. The plant, also known as jimson weed or devil’s trumpet, is a potent member of the alkaloid family with antimuscarinic properties. American physicians in the 19th century would commonly recommend patients to smoke datura leaves for relief of asthma and obstructive airway… Read More…