Posts Tagged ‘Insights’

Calreticulin (CALR): A new player in the mutational landscape of myeloproliferative disorders

Posted by • December 18th, 2013

Advances in molecular biology and sequencing technology have expanded our understanding of myeloproliferative disorders while aiding in the identification of the molecular defects that underlie these diseases. The first among these discoveries was the identification of the oncogenic fusion protein Bcr-abl in CML. Subsequent work lead to the discovery of a small molecule inhibitor, imatinib… Read More…

The Cold Truth: Rethinking Temperature Management after Cardiac Arrest

Posted by • December 4th, 2013

Over a decade ago, two pivotal trials altered the standard of care for unconscious patients after cardiac arrest.  Many of these patients suffer severe neurologic injury and death; researchers sought a treatment that could reduce global brain ischemia and prevent neurologic damage even when initiated after cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the restoration of circulation. The trial results,… Read More…

Efficacy Trial of a DNA/rAd5 HIV-1 Preventive Vaccine

Posted by • November 27th, 2013

Gamblers, poker players, and Las Vegas casino visitors all have their schemes for when to hold their cards, when to fold, and which cards are keepers or losers. In medical research, those decisions belong mainly to a Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB), an independent group of statistical and clinical experts who monitor patient safety… Read More…

Voided Midstream Urine Culture and Acute Cystitis in Premenopausal Women

Posted by • November 14th, 2013

Your patient is a healthy 32 year old woman with moderate to severe dysuria and urinary frequency. You suspect cystitis, so you ask her for a urine sample, and send it for culture, to confirm the diagnosis. You prescribe antibiotics, pending culture results, to alleviate her symptoms. This scenario is repeated countless times for the millions… Read More…

Test-tubes and Tumors: Cancer Risk in Children Born after Assisted Conception

Posted by • November 6th, 2013

When Louise Brown was born at Oldham General Hospital in 1978, her arrival brought even more excitement than your average infant. Her birth prompted a flurry of media attention, commentary from the man who would soon become Pope John Paul I, and a Nobel Prize for physiologist Sir Robert Edwards. Why all the fuss? Louise… Read More…

Got Skills? In Surgery, It Matters.

Posted by • October 9th, 2013

In the science fiction film “Prometheus,” set in the year 2093, surgery is depicted as a purely automated process. A woman climbs into a capsule-shaped machine; with the touch of a few buttons, the machine sets to work preparing a sterile field, making an incision, extracting a specimen, and stapling her back up. No surgeon… Read More…