Posts in the ‘Physicians-In-Training’ Category

The posts below are excerpted from the NEJM Resident e-Bulletin, a free weekly email of teaching topics. Including the content here in Now@NEJM enables you to have a conversation or ask questions about clinical points that interest you. To receive the email version, register as a student or resident on NEJM.org.

Testicular Cancer

Posted by Carla Rothaus • November 21st, 2014

The treatment of testicular cancer is a success story in oncology. With available methods, 95% of men with this condition can be cured. Emphasis is shifting toward maintaining high cure rates and reducing or effectively managing late effects of treatment.  A new review article on this topic comes from Dr. Nasser Hanna and Lawrence Einhorn… Read More…

Glycemic Control in Type 1 Diabetes

Posted by Carla Rothaus • November 21st, 2014

In a new study, patients with type 1 diabetes and a glycated hemoglobin level of 6.9% or lower (≤52 mmol per mole) were found to have a risk of death from any cause or from cardiovascular causes that was twice as high as that for matched controls. The excess risks of death from any cause… Read More…

The α-Thalassemias

Posted by Carla Rothaus • November 14th, 2014

More than 100 varieties of α-thalassemia have been identified. Their geographic distribution and the challenges associated with screening, diagnosis, and management suggest that α-thalassemias should have a higher priority on global public health agendas.  A new review article on this topic comes from the University of Oxford’s Drs. Frédéric Piel and David Weatherall. The α-thalassemias represent a… Read More…

Fevers, Chest Pain, and Substance-Use Disorder

Posted by Carla Rothaus • November 14th, 2014

In the latest Case Record of the Massachusetts General Hospital, a 31-year-old woman with substance-use disorder was admitted to this hospital because of fevers and chest pain. CT of the chest revealed multiple thick-walled nodular opacities throughout both lungs. Diagnostic tests were performed, and management decisions were made. Between 2007 and 2009 in the United… Read More…

Lung-Cancer Screening

Posted by Carla Rothaus • November 7th, 2014

A large randomized trial showed that low-dose CT screening reduced the risk of lung-cancer death by 20% among long-time smokers. Recent guidelines support consideration of screening but with attention to the possibility of false positive results and associated risks. Read the latest Clinical Practice review on this topic. Despite advances in diagnosis, staging, and treatment,… Read More…

A Chilly Fever

Posted by Carla Rothaus • November 7th, 2014

A 30-year-old graduate student presented with fevers associated with shaking chills and severe headaches. He had been well until 1 week before presentation, when he began to have daily fevers, with temperatures as high as 39.4°C. Any fever in a patient who has had possible exposure to malaria should prompt consideration of this diagnosis. Clinical Pearls… Read More…

Simvastatin in the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

Posted by Sara Fazio • October 31st, 2014

In a recent study, patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome who were not receiving statins were assigned to receive simvastatin or placebo. At 28 days, there were no significant between-group differences in survival or in the number of ventilator-free days. The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a common, devastating clinical syndrome characterized by life-threatening… Read More…

Focal Seizures and Progressive Weakness

Posted by Sara Fazio • October 31st, 2014

In the latest Case Record of the Massachusetts General Hospital, a 7-year-old boy was evaluated because of focal seizures, twitching of the right arm and the right side of the face, and progressive weakness. Imaging revealed progressive left cortical atrophy and a focal lesion in the left parietal cortex. A diagnostic procedure was performed. Rasmussen’s… Read More…

60-Year-Old Man with Bone Pain

Posted by Sara Fazio • October 24th, 2014

In the latest Case Record of the Massachusetts General Hospital, a 60-year-old man was seen in the outpatient cancer center because of bone pain that had lasted for 2 months and the presence of lytic bone lesions on imaging studies. Biopsy specimens of bone marrow and bone lesions showed increased mast cells. A diagnostic procedure… Read More…

Community-Acquired Pneumonia

Posted by Sara Fazio • October 24th, 2014

Community-acquired pneumonia is a commonly diagnosed illness in which no causative organism is identified in half the cases. Application of molecular diagnostic techniques has the potential to lead to more targeted therapy in the face of increasing antibiotic resistance. A new review article looks at this topic. Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a syndrome in which… Read More…