Posts in the ‘What’s New’ Category

Take the Fluids and Electrolytes Challenge

Posted by Jennifer Zeis • July 22nd, 2015

A 28-year-old man presents with diabetic ketoacidosis after an influenza-like illness. Lab values include: sodium 144 mmol/L, potassium 5.7 mmol /L, chloride 98 mmol /L, sodium bicarbonate 13 mmol/L, creatinine 1.5 mg/dL, BUN 30 mg/dL, glucose 702 mg/dL, and venous pH 7.2. What is the best strategy to support this patient? Take the poll and comment… Read More…

Now on the NEJM Group Open Forum

Posted by Jennifer Zeis • July 21st, 2015

Here’s an update with the latest on the NEJM Group Open Forum. The NEJM CareerCenter, in conjunction with Medstro and the American Physician Scientist Association, today opens an exploration of topics related to physician-scientist careers. Take the opportunity to chat with an esteemed panel from the National Institutes of Health, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and the Mayo… Read More…

Take the New Case Challenge!

Posted by Karen Buckley • July 16th, 2015

A 28-year-old pregnant woman was admitted in the summer with fever, headache, and fatigue. She reported neck stiffness, earache, intermittent contractions, and a possible erythematous rash on her shin. What is the most likely diagnosis? Vote and comment now on NEJM.org. The answer will appear within the full text of the Case Record of the Massachusetts… Read More…

Apply to Be an NEJM Editorial Fellow

Posted by Karen Buckley • July 6th, 2015

The NEJM invites applications for two one-year, full-time, paid editorial fellowships beginning in July 2016 from medical professionals at any career stage. Applications are due by September 1, 2015. The editorial fellows review and edit Images in Clinical Medicine submissions, organize the Clinical Decisions series and write the Quick Takes under the supervision of senior editors…. Read More…

New Interactive Medical Case: Test Your Skills

Posted by Karen Buckley • June 24th, 2015

Approximately 10 minutes after being stung on the right lower leg by a yellow jacket (a type of wasp), a 45-year-old man began to feel lightheaded and nauseated.  He called emergency medical services, and paramedics arrived 10 minutes later.  They found him to be alert but anxious, with scattered areas of erythema on his trunk… Read More…

Now on the NEJM Group Open Forum

Posted by Karen Buckley • April 27th, 2015

There’s a lot happening on the NEJM Group Open Forum: Talk with authors and experts about a new study involving multiple US neonatal intensive care units that demonstrated a substantial increase in admissions for neonatal abstinence syndrome between 2004 and 2011, as well as increases in associated length of stay and in the percentage of NICU days nationwide… Read More…

Take the New Interactive Medical Case!

Posted by Karen Buckley • April 9th, 2015

A 43-year-old man with a 6-week history of abdominal pain and diarrhea. The pain was initially epigastric and occurred after eating but then became more constant and diffuse.  The patient rated the pain at 7 on a scale of 0 to 10, with 10 being the most severe pain.  The diarrhea began gradually and was… Read More…

NEJM Group Open Forum – Take part in the conversation!

Posted by Karen Buckley • April 7th, 2015

These active and engaging discussions are happening now on the NEJM Group Open Forum on Medstro.com. Read the questions and answers posted so far, like, share and comment to become a part of the conversation. Women Transforming the Culture of Medicine: How do women physicians communicate with each other and with their male colleagues? Can the… Read More…

Take the Case Challenge: A Woman with Headache, Fever, and Rash

Posted by Jennifer Zeis • March 26th, 2015

A 28-year-old woman presented with headache, fever, and a rash, plus nausea and one episode of nonbloody, nonbilious emesis. The skin lesions were small, red, flat, nonpruritic, and nonpainful. What is the most likely diagnosis? What diagnostic tests are indicated? Read the case description. Then vote and comment about what the diagnosis may be and what… Read More…

Putting on and Removing PPE

Posted by Karen Buckley • March 25th, 2015

Personal protective equipment, or PPE, is used when there is a risk of exposure to infectious material, to protect the skin and mucous membranes from exposure to pathogens. A new Video in Clinical Medicine demonstrates putting on and removing PPE. This important information is now available on the Ebola Outbreak page, or browse all 59 Videos in… Read More…