Read the Latest 200th Anniversary Articles

Posted by Karen Buckley • February 16th, 2012

During the 2012 anniversary year, we are publishing a series of engaging Review and Perspective articles from established authors who are preeminent in their fields. Each article explores a story of progress in medicine over the past 200 years. These articles will appear every other week.

The relationship between patients and doctors is at the core of medical ethics, serving as an anchor for many important debates in the field. Dr. Robert Truog delves into the topic in a 200th anniversary Perspective article, new this week, and talks more about it in an audio interview, available online now.

In the first article in our anniversary review series, Drs. Eugene Braunwald and Elizabeth Nabel explore the evolution of the understanding and treatment of coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction since angina pectoris was described in the first issue of NEJM in 1812. Read the review and take a look back at the original report from January 1812.

In the second article in our anniversary review series, Drs. Anthony Fauci and David Morens of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases highlight the tremendous advances that have been made in the field of infectious disease over 200 years, from the identification of microbes, to defining their genetic structure, to the development of focused antimicrobial therapies, to the realization of vector biology.

Other anniversary articles now available include a Perspective article in which Dr. Allan Brandt reflects on the seismic change in medical knowledge and practice covered in NEJM over the past two centuries, including an audio interview with the author, and an editorial from current NEJM editors.

On March 1st, look for a new review from Drs. Jeffrey Drazen and Erika von Mutius, “An Asthma Patient Seeks Medical Advice in 1828, 1928 and 2012.”

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