Posts Tagged ‘breast cancer’

Ribociclib for HR-Positive Breast Cancer

Posted by • November 3rd, 2016

Hortobagyi et al. conducted the Mammary Oncology Assessment of LEE011’s (Ribociclib’s) Efficacy and Safety (MONALEESA-2) trial, which evaluated the efficacy and safety of the combination of ribociclib and letrozole as initial therapy in postmenopausal women with hormone-receptor (HR)–positive, human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2)–negative advanced breast cancer. In patients with advanced HR-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer,… Read More…

Breast Cancer Tumor Size, Mammography, and Screening Effectiveness

Posted by • October 12th, 2016

A good screening test is capable of identifying a precursor or early-stage disease in an asymptomatic patient and targets a disease for which early treatment is available to improve the patient’s ultimate outcome. Controversies about mammography screening guidelines for early detection of breast cancer include the appropriate age to start and stop screening, the frequency… Read More…

The 70-Gene Signature as an Aid to Treatment Decisions in Early Breast Cancer

Posted by • August 24th, 2016

“Your cancer has been successfully removed with surgery, but there may be a role for chemotherapy to protect you in the future.” This message is expressed by oncologists in consulting rooms all over the world. In women with early-stage breast cancer, adjuvant chemotherapy may be offered as an insurance policy against cancer recurrence. Risk of… Read More…

Extending Aromatase-Inhibitor Therapy

Posted by • July 21st, 2016

The risk of recurrence of hormone-receptor–positive early breast cancer continues indefinitely. The MA.17R trial, conducted by Goss et al., examined the effects of treatment with an aromatase inhibitor for 10 years rather than 5 years after any duration of prior treatment with tamoxifen, in postmenopausal women with hormone-receptor–positive early breast cancer. An additional 5 years of… Read More…

Extending Aromatase-Inhibitor Treatment in Breast Cancer

Posted by • June 29th, 2016

I am approaching the end of my general surgery residency and trying to decide on a sub-specialty going forward.  Over the past 2 years I have found myself drawn to the field of breast surgery, in large part due to the large breadth of research being done in the field.  Research in breast cancer has… Read More…

A Boy with a Breast Mass

Posted by • April 22nd, 2016

When evaluating a boy with breast enlargement, diagnostic considerations include gynecomastia, benign breast lesions, and cancer. An 8-year-old boy presented with a mass in the right breast that had been present for 18 months and had enlarged during the previous 6 months. On examination, a firm, mobile mass (2 cm by 2 cm) was present under the… Read More…

Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer

Posted by • February 5th, 2016

Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer is a syndrome that involves an increased predisposition to breast cancer, ovarian cancer, or both and an autosomal dominant pattern of transmission. Risk-reducing mastectomy and risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy are options for the primary prevention of breast and ovarian cancers, and they have been shown in multiple studies to have efficacy. The risk… Read More…

Circulating Tumor DNA

Posted by • March 27th, 2013

Fifty years ago, oncologists relied upon the clinical exam to follow breast cancer patients with metastatic disease. Patients were treated with chemotherapy, and then the physicians waited for symptoms to return before deciding on the next treatment course. Some patients could go months or even years without symptoms, but during this time they played a… Read More…

Radiotherapy and Subsequent Heart Disease

Posted by • March 13th, 2013

The 65-year old woman in your clinic was diagnosed with breast cancer five years ago, when a radiologist noted a suspicious shadow on a routine mammogram. She was lucky. Her cancer was treated with lumpectomy and radiation and now – half a decade later – she is thrilled when you tell her that she remains disease-free…. Read More…

What’s Behind the Screen? A Look at Screening Mammography and Breast Cancer Incidence

Posted by • November 21st, 2012

The number of women being screened for breast cancer continues to be high, but the population benefits of screening are becoming increasingly unclear. In 2010, a year after the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) revised its recommendations in favor of less screening mammography, NEJM published findings from a major cohort study suggesting that screening mammography… Read More…