Posts Tagged ‘HIV’

Influenza Vaccination in Pregnancy

Posted by Rupa Kanapathipillai • September 3rd, 2014

As the days get shorter and cooler, you have an increasing sense of dread that Winter Is Coming – and with it comes flu season.   Once you stop daydreaming of the halcyon days of summer, you notice that in your waiting room are two pregnant patients, one HIV positive, one HIV negative. You take a… Read More…

46-Year-Old Woman in Botswana with Postcoital Bleeding

Posted by Sara Fazio • May 23rd, 2014

In the latest Case Record of the Massachusetts General Hospital, a 46-year-old woman with HIV and a high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion was evaluated in Botswana because of postcoital bleeding. During examination of the cervix and vagina, a large fungating lesion was seen. Diagnostic procedures were performed. Postcoital bleeding is defined as bleeding that occurs during… Read More…

29-Year-Old Man with Headache and Diplopia

Posted by Sara Fazio • March 14th, 2014

In the latest Case Record of the Massachusetts General Hospital, a 29-year-old man was admitted to the hospital because of headache, vomiting, photophobia, diplopia, and stiff neck. He was born in Southeast Asia. Brain imaging showed diffuse leptomeningeal enhancement. Cultures were sterile. A diagnostic procedure was performed. Chronic meningitis differs in important ways from acute… Read More…

Malaise and Chest and Abdominal Pain

Posted by Sara Fazio • November 29th, 2013

In the latest Case Record of the Massachusetts General Hospital, a 41-year-old woman with a history of HIV infection was admitted to the hospital because of malaise and chest and abdominal pain. Initial laboratory evaluation was notable for elevated hepatic aminotransferase levels. Diagnostic procedures were performed. Hepatic injury with significant elevations in transaminases has been… Read More…

Abdominal Pain, Fever, and Weight Loss

Posted by Sara Fazio • October 11th, 2013

In the latest Case Record of the Massachusetts General Hospital, a 29-year-old man was seen in an outpatient clinic because of abdominal pain, fever, and weight loss. Testing for HIV antibodies was positive, and the CD4 T-lymphocyte count was 10 per cubic millimeter. Chest imaging revealed tiny nodules in both lungs. This case illustrates the… Read More…

The AIDS Pandemic

Posted by Sara Fazio • June 7th, 2013

The HIV–AIDS pandemic is now in its fourth decade. The latest article in our new Global Health series describes how HIV–AIDS has been transformed from a death sentence into a manageable illness and outlines the need for continued and coordinated international efforts. It was not until the third decade of the epidemic that the world’s… Read More…

Injuries

Posted by Sara Fazio • May 3rd, 2013

Injuries, whether intentional or unintentional, account for a substantial burden on the health care system. The latest article in our new Global Health series describes the magnitude of the problem worldwide, enumerates ongoing efforts to prevent injuries, and summarizes systems that need to be in place to care for the injured. In 2010, there were… Read More…

Would You Recommend Preexposure Prophylaxis for HIV Prevention?

Posted by Karen Buckley • August 2nd, 2012

In our latest Clinical Decisions, two patients— a 46-year-old man from New York who has sex with men and an 18-year-old heterosexual woman with multiple partners in South Africa — are at risk for infection with HIV.  Would you recommend preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP)? This question comes on the heels of three large studies of oral… Read More…

Antiretroviral Prophylaxis for HIV Prevention

Posted by Jamie Colbert • August 1st, 2012

What if there was a medication that one could take every day to prevent the acquisition of HIV? This approach to combat HIV is called pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP.  The idea behind PrEP is that the same antiretroviral medications that are used to treat HIV infected individuals could also help protect non-infected individuals from acquiring… Read More…

Vote for the Most Important Article, 1990-1999

Posted by Karen Buckley • July 26th, 2012

There are only five days left to vote for the NEJM article that you think was the most significant advance of the 1990s.  Which one of these was it? Vote now! Although it had previously been shown that Helicobacter pylori caused gastritis and peptic ulcers, two pioneering studies published in 1991, led by Nomura and Parsonnet,… Read More…